Taichung City Taiwan



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Description: Open source travel guide to Taichung, featuring up-to-date information on attractions, hotels, restaurants, nightlife, travel tips and more. Free and reliable advice written by Wikitravellers from around the globe.

Taichung (臺中 or 台中; Tái-zhōng ) [1] is located in the west-central part of the island of Taiwan. It has a pleasant climate and a population of just over 2.6 million people, making it the third largest city on the island after New Taipei and Kaohsiung. The city is home to many manufacturers and in recent years has experienced rapid growth in the diversity of its cultural offerings.

Taiwanese aborigines originally populated the plain where modern Taichung City is located. They lived by cultivating millet and taro and hunting deer. Several local names in central Taiwan contain the word for "deer," including Shalu Township and Lukang Township in Changhua County.

Taichung was founded in 1705 as a part of Changhua County, originally named Dadun (ch: 大墩; p: Dàdūn; w: Ta-tun; lit. large mound). At this point in history, the Qing Dynasty, formed by invading Manchus in the 1640s, was consolidating its hold on western Taiwan, which it had wrested from the Cheng family in 1682. As a part of strengthening its control, a garrison was founded in 1721 near the site of present-day Taichung Park by Lan Ting-chen.

All was not peaceful for Qing authorities in central Taiwan. North of the city, at the Dajia River, an aboriginal revolt broke out in 1731 after Chinese officials moved in and compelled them to provide labor. After being joined by other aboriginals, they drove as far south as the county seat of Changhua in May, 1732 before being chased into the mountains by Qing forces.

Another rebellion, this one in 1786, against Qing authorities had its roots in the nearby town of Dali, just south of Taichung City. Led by Lin Shuang-wen, it began as an attempt to overthrow the Manchu government and restore the Ming Dynasty. Unfortunately, as they moved northward, they turned to slaughter and looting. They were eventually defeated by a coalition of Hakka, Quanzhou Fujianese descendants, and Aboriginal volunteers who joined with the government to defeat the rebels.

Taiwan became a province of Qing Dynasty China in 1885, and the city, named Dadun at the time, was named capital of Taiwan Prefecture, one of three prefectures in the newly created Taiwan Province. It was also initially designated as the provincial capital, and Qing official Liu Mung-chuan received the authority from the Guangxu Emperor to oversee development of the area. However, four years later, Liu was forced to “retire” by Empress Dowager Cixi, and the provincial capital was moved to what is now known as Taipei.

China lost the Sino-Japanese War in 1895. As a consequence, the Qing Dynasty was forced to cede Taiwan to the Japanese under Treaty of Shimonoseki. The Japanese changed the name of the city from Dadun to Taichū (台中), and began to develop the city, setting out to make it the first “modern” area of Taiwan.

However, Taichū bore the brunt of early Japanese repression. There were many rebels who stated that they had accepted amnesty from the earlier period of rebellion when the Republic of Taiwan was declared in 1895. However, many of those same people continued anti-Japanese activities. On May 25, 1902, some 360 rebels and their families accepted invitations to surrender and receive amnesty and rewards. Instead of receiving amnesty, once inside, the Japanese locked the doors and slaughtered the former rebels.

Taichū Park was completed in 1903. The old north gate, one of the few Liu-era structures to survive the Japanese reconstruction of the city, was moved to the new park. To this day, Taichung Park is one of the most popular places in the city for people to relax.

The first market in Taichū was built in 1908 along JiGuang Road between ZhongZheng and ChengGong Roads. It is still used today, and is a popular spot to purchase food and other items in downtown Taichung. Taichung Middle School (now known as Taichung First High School) was founded in 1913 by Lin Hsien-tang and his brother Lin Lie-tang, two wealthy Taiwanese intellectuals of the era. This was done in an effort to teach children the traditional culture of Taiwan and to foster a sense of local pride.

Taichū was officially designated as a city by Japanese Imperial authorities in 1920, and Taichū City Hall was completed in 1924 after eleven years of construction.

A Taiwanese cultural association founded in 1921 in Taipei by Lin Hsien-tang was moved to Taichū in 1927. Most of the members of this association were from Taichū and the surrounding area. The city became a center of Taiwanese culture and nationalism.

The newly-found prosperity of Taichū was eventually squandered by the war effort. When World War II ended in 1945, Taiwan’s economy, like Japan’s, was in shambles.

The Japanese were forced to surrender to Republic of China forces on behalf of Allied forces on 1945-10-25, who came across the Strait on U.S. ships and accepted their surrender on behalf of the Allied Powers.

The Kuomintang (KMT), also known as the Chinese Nationalist Party, relocated the government of the Republic of China to Taiwan upon losing the Chinese Civil War to the Communists.

The early post-war era was one of transition and turmoil for Taiwan. Taiwanese nationalists had divided into three prominent groups, one of which was known as the Taichung Clique. These were men with relatively high social standing during the Japanese era, such as Lin Hsien-t’ang, Yang Chao-chia, Yeh Jung-chung, and others. These men attempted to take what they believed to be their rightful place as the political leaders of the island. However, the administrator of the island, Chen Yi, opposed this faction as it contained many people, especially merchants and landlords, who had opposed his policies.

Under the authorities of the Republic of China, Taichung had become the center for organized crime and associated businesses.

On 2010-12-25, Taichung City and County of Taiwan Province merged into a new a special municipality of Taichung.

Taichung is divided into 29 geographical subdivisions, including the following 8 in Taichung City before 2010-12-25:

  • Beitun District. (北屯區): Geographically, this is the largest district in the city, spreading from the north to the northeastern-most reaches of the city. It includes the comparatively rural area of Dakeng. It also includes the Taichung Folk Park and Morrison Academy.
  • Central District. (中區): This is the smallest and most densely populated district in the city. It is home to the Taichung Train Station, Taichung Park, and a large number of traditional businesses in the downtown area. This district is home to the original suncake shop on ZiyouRoad (自由路) and is where most of Taichung's major businesses used to be located.
  • East District. (東區): Literally on the other side of the tracks from the main part of the downtown area. The Taichung Central Department Store is located here.
  • Nantun District. (南屯區): Occupies the southwestern-most portions of the city. There is still considerable farmland in this area, but a High Speed Rail is expected to open in a few months in adjacent Wuri, and the Taichung city government plans to move the city hall into this district. Currently, Nantun is most well-known for high property values and expensive, luxurious cottages, which have in turn attracted many large department stores into adjacent areas of Xitun District.
  • North District. (北區): Nestled between Central and Beitun Districts, it is home to the Taichung First Senior High school and Yizhong Street (一中街,) one of the best known night markets in the city. It is also home to the Natural Science Museum, Chungyou Department Store, and Zhongshan Hall.
  • Xitun District. (西屯區): This district spreads out to the western edge of the city and is home to Feng Chia and Tunghai Universities. It is also the location of many of the new, fashionable shopping areas in the city and is the area of greatest growth. The Taichung Industrial Park, World Trade Center, and the Chaoma Bus Station, a major embarkation point from the city. Major department stores include Idee, Shinkong Mitsukoshi, and Tiger City.
  • South District. (南區): Occupying the southernmost part of the city, it is home to National Chung Hsing University and the Taichung Industrial High School.
  • West District. (西區): West District is home to the National Fine Arts Museum as well as the Municipal Cultural Center. A lot of cultural activities were held here. This area is also known for its restaurants, which have attracted many people come with their reputation for exotic cuisine. Taichung’s City Hall is here, as is National Taichung University. Sogo Department store is in the northern part of the district.




Photogallery Taichung City Taiwan:



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City of Taichung, Taiwan Scenery for FSX

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